Tillman Departure Marks the End of an Era

 

Charles TillmanThe Charles Tillman era has come to an end in Chicago as the creator and master of the “Peanut Punch” made his windy city departure official, inking a one-year deal with the Carolina Panthers. The signing marks the end of Tillman’s 12 year stay in Chicago, which included two Pro Bowls and a Super Bowl appearance in 2006. The move will reunite Tillman with Panthers coach Ron Rivera, who ran the defense in Chicago from 2004-2006. 

While Tillman will go down as one of the best defensive backs in franchise history, the last two seasons have been frustrating for the veteran. A torn right tricep two seasons ago kept Tillman out eight games and he went on to miss all but two games of last season after suffering the same injury.

Tillman, Lance Briggs and Roberto Garza were the only remaining starting position players left on the roster from that 2006 team (kicker Robbie Gould still remains), and with Garza’s release and Briggs all but gone, this marks the end of an era for the Bears and their most successful defense since the 1985 “Monsters of the Midway”.

The truth is, everything started to change when Lovie Smith was fired at the end of 2012. That season was also Brian Urlacher’s last, whose tenure with the Bears came to a rocky end when his agents proposed a two-year, $11 million contract to the Bears, and Bears management came back with a “take-it-or-leave-it” offer of one year at $2 million which he decided to leave. To call the break up between Urlacher and the Bears unfriendly would be an understatement, and with the hiring of Marc Trestman in 2013, the Bears marched out two of the worst defenses in franchise history in consecutive seasons. The defense never truly believed in Trestman or defensive coordinator Mel Tucker, who failed to provide the team with any kind of defensive prowess or identity.

And while it is easy to focus on the bad ending with Urlacher, the unrest with Briggs last season and the injuries that have plagued TIllman the last couple seasons, it is important to not only acknowledge but to celebrate the great Bears teams on which they played significant roles. The defense carried the team during Tillman’s time in blue and orange, with the defense priding themselves on forcing turnovers and scoring points. It wasn’t just a strength of the team, it was necessary. With struggling offenses led by Rex Grossman and Kyle Orton, the Bears relied on the defense to win them games and they consistently came through, often scoring more points on defense than on offense. This defense was not as good as the ’85 Bears or even the ’63 Bears, but they did lead a team to a Super Bowl. It was a special team and Tillman will  no doubt be remembered as one of the pillars of that group.

Through all of the drama of the last couple seasons, Tillman has remained a consummate professional. He was not only a hero on the field, but in the community as well. The Charles Tillman foundation has given more than $1 million to families in need. Tillman won the NFL Salute to Service Award in 2012, and in 2014 received the Walter Payton NFL Man of the Year award.

Letting Tillman walk was probably the right decision for the Bears as they try to  remake their defense, but his leadership will be missed. As of right now there is no clear leader on the Bears, something they’ve been lacking of late. A new era is starting in Chicago. How this next chapter will look is yet to be seen and who will lead them forward is still a question mark – but hopefully they can learn from someone like Tillman, who always led with passion, dedication and class.

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